Posted by: Katie B | January 10, 2012

Rejection is Not Always Not So Sweet

 

Hope

I’m sharing my most recent rejection, because it was one of the better ones I’ve gotten.  The agent shared with me why she didn’t like my work.  Priceless, priceless feedback for a hopeful author.  Perhaps you can learn something from my pain (oh, I mean reward).  Thick skin.  Working on the thick skin…

“Unfortunately, BIRTHRITE is not quite right for us, so I am going to pass.  It’s an interesting concept, but I admit that I feel the reader needs to be eased into the story a bit more.  It felt like you dropped the reader into your brain without context or background knowledge.  Of course, feeling lost is not the state in which you want a young reader.  No doubt you have created a magical world and you don’t want to spend too much time giving background information, but I think a bit more weaving in is essential in order for a young reader to want to go on this journey.  I hope you don’t mind me elaborating a bit, but I do so in case it proves helpful.

In the end, though, it wouldn’t be fair to you or your work if I could not get 110% behind your projects.  Given how subjective this business is, I am sure there are others who will feel differently.  Best of luck as you continue to make those connections.  Again, my sincere thanks for entrusting me with you work.

Wishing you much success on your journey,

Agent xyz”

Advertisements

Responses

  1. I found the agent’s comments interesting, and perhaps something to consider. I just heard Michele Burke (Knopf) speak about world building, and she said the first few pages are critical in setting the scene. The author of a novel that is set in another world or time need to create a setting that is “invitingly different but comfortably familiar.” Sorry Birthrite was passed up. I still think it is an incredible story and those who pass on it will someday regret it.

  2. I love your story. We live in a post sesame street/twitter/game world where people get bored if it takes too long to set the stage. Pace and tonal quality perfect.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: